Past events
Challenges of payment-for-performance in public services - implications for health care
How can evaluation contribute to health policy in England?
Monday 13 June 2011, 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Manson Theatre, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, WC1E 7HT

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine will host the launch of two new Department of Health policy research units on 13 June 2011 in London. The Units are funded by the Policy Research Programme of the Department of Health.

The Policy Research Unit in Policy Innovation Research (PIRU) will be officially opened along with the Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Healthcare System (PRUComm).

The guest speaker will be Professor Mark Petticrew, delivering an inaugural lecture entitled: Policy evaluation in an age of evidence-based decision-making: what should it look like?

SPEAKERS, PANEL AND CHAIR

Peter Piot photo

Peter Piot, (Speaker)
Director, LSHTM. Read more >>

Sandra Williams photo

Sandra Williams, (Speaker)
Director, DH, Policy Research Programme (PRP).

Stephen Peckham photo

Stephen Peckham, (Speaker & Panel)
Director, PRUComm. Read more >>

Nicholas Mays photo

Nicholas Mays, (Speaker)
Director, PIRU. Read more >>

Mark Petticrew photo

Mark Petticrew, (Speaker & Panel)
Professor of Public Health Evaluation, LSHTM. Read more >>

Professor Ken Judge photo

Professor Ken Judge, (Panel)
Head of the Department for Health, University of Bath. Read more >>

Clive Smee photo

Clive Smee, (Panel)
Visiting Professor, Department of Economics, University of Surrey. Read more >>

Richard Murray photo

Richard Murray, (Panel)
Director, Financial Planning and Allocations, Department of Health.

PROGRAMME

Sandra Williams: What the Department of Health aims to achieve with its Policy Research Programme, Policy Research Units and Research Consortia

Stephen Peckham & Nicholas Mays: How PRUComm and PIRU will contribute to policy evaluation and advice

Mark Petticrew: Policy evaluation in an age of evidence-based decision-making: what should it look like?